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KELLY, Alexander

KELLY, Alexander. 1769 – 1844. Alexander is buried in the Crooked Creek Cemetery in Bethel Township.

KERR, William

Revolutionary War Pension File #W3560
William Kerr was born 5 January 1758. He enlisted at Hannastown, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania on 9 August 1776. He served as a private in the companies of Captains Samuel Miller, Swearingen, and Moore, in Colonel Aenas Mackays Eighth Pennsylvania Regiment. He was in the battles of Ash Swamp, Boundbrook, the capture of Burgoyne, and several skirmishes. He was discharged at Pittsburgh 10 October 1779. He appeared before the court of Armstrong County on 17 June 1818 to apply for a pension, which was approved. He was a resident of Allegheny Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. He died 20 January 1832. His wife was named Margaret, born 15 April 1785. She died 17 May 1843 at the home of William Gallaher in Westmoreland County. William Gallaher gave a sworn statement as to the wife and children of William Kerr. He was also one of the executors of William Kerr’s will, abstracted below. William Kerr died 20 January 1832. Son Alexander Kerr also appeared before the court. For the children of William & Margaret Kerr, please see Bible Records on this site.

Armstrong County, Pennsylvania Courthouse Records, Will Abstracts
KERR, William of Allegheny Township, Armstrong County. Mentions: beloved wife Margaret; sons Robert, William Jr., John & Alexander; daughters Elizabeth, wife of Joseph LOWERY; Hannah, married; Martha, wife of William GALLIHER; and Anne, single. Appoints Joseph LOWERY of Plumcreek Township and William GALLIHER of Allegheny Township as executors. Written 28 January 1831. Witnesses: Joseph H. KERR and William WATSON, Esq.
Registered 3 February 1832, Will Book 1, page 128.

The pension file says William Kerr died in Westmoreland County but the will shows he was still a resident of Armstrong County at his death. His widow Margaret did go to Westmoreland County, where she died.

KING, George Adam

KING, George Adam. 1765 – 1843. King is buried in the Bush Cemetery in Burrell Township. (Source: Christine Crawford Oppenheimer)

KING, John

KING, John. Private, 2nd Regiment, PA Continental Army. King was in Maj. John Murray’s Company under Col. Walter Stewart. He was age 29, 5 feet and 5 inches tall; his occupation was a butcher; born in Annapolis (town), Maryland. On the roll dated 9 September 1778. Certificate dated 29 Oct. 1784, pay for 1 Aug. 1780 to 1 Jan. 1781 was $33.00. From the PA Archives, 5th Serics; Vol. IV, pp. 501 – 502. Revolutionary War Declarations, Armstrong Co., PA. 6 March 1813 – Robert Beaty, Guy Hiccox, David Crawford, Samuel Matthews, John Gillespie, Robert Brown, Hacey Jack all testify that John King was in Capt. Spear’s Company under command of Col. Steward of 2nd PA. Regiment, and is now a resident of Kittanning Township in Armstrong Co. (Source: “Western Pennsylvania Genealogical Society Quarterly”, May 1981. Volume 7, number 4.)

KING, Jonathan

KING, Jonathan. 1757 – 1837. Resided in Sugar Creek Township. (Early Deaths & Marriages, pg. 50)

Revolutionary Pension File # S13645. King, Jonathan.
19 September 1832. Jonathan King, a resident of Sugarcreek Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, appeared before the Court in Kittanning to make sworn declarations in order to obtain a Revolutionary War Pension. He said he was born in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, in 1757. He has the record of his age in his father’s handwriting, taken from his father’s bible. He had lived in Northampton County until 1794, when he moved to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. He stayed there five years and then came to Armstrong County.

The Pension File states that he fought in no battles during the War. He enlisted for 6 months as a Private under Captain John Santee of the Flying Camp, March 1776. In April 1880, he served as a Lieutenant for 3 1/2 months under Captain George Nulff. Jonathan King died 14 June 1837.

Jacob Wolff was one of the men who appeared before the Court in Kittanning to testify as to Jonathan King’s character. Jacob Wolff said that he “lived within three quarters of a mile of the applicant Jonathan King from childhood”. They entered the service together in March 1776, in the Flying Camp under Captain John Santee at Easton, Northampton County, Pennsylvania. Source: Revolutionary War Pension File #S13645, King, Jonathan.

Note: Jacob Wolff was married to Christina King, sister of Jonathan. Kathy Marcinek

PENSION ROLL OF 1835, THE MID-ATLANTIC STATES. ARMSTRONG COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA
KING, Jonathan, Private & Lieutenant
Annual Allowance: $66.65
Sums Received: $199.95
Description of Service: Pennsylvania Militia
Placed on Pension Roll: 15 July 1833
Commencement of Pension: 4 March 1831
Age: 77

Another source is the published Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, Volume IV, page 501. Continental Line, Pension Applications, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Brady’s Bend Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania.
“Adjoining the Spangler-McCall tract on the south is a similar one, 400 acres, the warrant for which was granted to James C. CAMPBELL, a portion of whose land history is given in the sketch of Sugar Creek Township, a considerable portion of its southern part being still in that township. The warrantee’s interest became vested in Charles CAMPBELL. It’s original settler was Jonathan KING, who was assesed with 200 acres, 1 horse and 3 cattle in 1804, at $148, and with the same and an additional horse the next year, at $158. He was residing on this tract when he was elected the second sheriff of this county in 1808.” “He was in his early life a soldier of the Revolutionary War, and was at the time of his death, which occured here June 16, 1837, aged 79 years, 8 months and 14 days.”

Source: History of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania by Robert Walter Smith, Esq. Chicago, Waterman, Watkins & Company, 1883. Page 565
Revolutionary Pension File # S13645. King, Jonathan.
19 September 1832. Jonathan King, a resident of Sugarcreek Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, appeared before the Court in Kittanning to make sworn declarations in order to obtain a Revolutionary War Pension. He said he was born in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, in 1757. He has the record of his age in his father’s handwriting, taken from his father’s bible. He had lived in Northampton County until 1794, when he moved to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. He stayed there five years and then came to Armstrong County.

The Pension File states that he fought in no battles during the War. He enlisted for 6 months as a Private under Captain John Santee of the Flying Camp, March 1776. In April 1880, he served as a Lieutenant for 3 1/2 months under Captain George Nulff. Jonathan King died 14 June 1837.

KING, Mathias

KING, Mathias. 1730 – 1810.
Mathias King is not buried in Armstrong County. In 1922, some descendants put up a monument to him and his family at Brick Church, Burrell Township, making it appear that he is buried there, but descendants today say he most likely is not. He died in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where his will was filed, and he is probably buried there. I have found sources that say he is definately buried in Westmoreland County. Mathias was the father of Jonathan King, above.

KIRKPATRICK, James

KIRKPATRICK, James. Served 4 months. (Source: “Early History of PA” by Iscrupe. Resided in Wayne Township.
Source: Revolutionary War Pension File #R5992:
James Kirkpatrick was born 25 September 1754, in the place that later became Shippensburg, Pennsylvania. He applied for a pension 16 June 1835, while a resident of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. He alleged the following: That while living in Shippensburg, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, he enlisted 7 July 1776, and served as 1st Sergeant in Captain Robert Culbertson’s Pennsylvania Regiment; that sometime in the fall of 1776 he moved to Westmoreland County and resided there until Armstrong County was formed from parts of Westmoreland & Lycoming Counties, and has since resided in Armstrong County, except for a period of seven years during which he resided in Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania, and that he now (1835) lives in Wayne Township, Armstrong County. He states he was called into service on 20 August 1778, and served as an ensign in Captain Marchant’s Company, Colonel Gibson’s Regiment, and was discharged 20 October 1778, and returned home. He then enlisted in February 1780, at Pittsburgh, and served as ensign in Captain Samuel Love’s Pennsylvania Company against the Cherokee Indians at Cuyahoga. He states he was discharged 24 April 1780. After the Revolutionary War he lived in Armstrong County, except for a period of seven years during which he resided in Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Soldier was dead in 1853 and survived by a son Moses. No other family is mentioned in the pension claim. His claim was not allowed as he failed to provide proof of service.
(He gives a very detailed account of his service, but the claim was still denied.)
James Kirkpatrick, upwards of 80 years of age, appeared before the Court in Kittanning in 1835. Here are some of the sworn statements he made upon his oath of his service after moving to Westmoreland County: In 1778, he was in a Company of Militia commanded by Dr. Marchand, Captain. They were stationed on the south of the Monongahela River to protect men sawing timber under Colonel Gibson’s direction. Kirkpatrick went out as often as two or three times a week on scouting parties, looking for Indians. Captain Miller was scouting to Fort Hand with eleven of his men. Near Fort Hand and Hannastown, near where he resided, he and ten men were killed by Indians, one escaping. Kirkpatrick and others were discharged 20 October 1778 and returned home. February 1780, men of different companies were to go on an expedition against the Indians. Kirkpatrick was in a Company commanded by Samuel Love. Peter Thomas of Sewickley was Lieutenant and Kirkpatrick was Ensign. There was one company of Continentals, one company of Virginia Militia, and several companies of Pennsylvania Militia, with General Hand having chief command. The troops set out for Cuyahoga, going down the Ohio and up Big Beaver, Simon Girty acting as pilot. Came to an Indian Town and killed an Indian who first wounded a Captain of the Continentals “and killed them a few boys & the Virginians killed them a few squaws”. Deponent Kirkpatrick and John Denniston and Samuel Mahaffey took one squaw prisoner and saved her life.

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