Revolutionary War Veterans

The only Revolutionary War Veterans from Armstrong County are the ones who came here after the war and settled and died here. Armstrong was not a county until 1800, and it wasn’t until 1805 when the county held court.

Please leave a Reply to add another soldier or information or submit corrections.

The Revolutionary War began on 19 April 1775, when a group of colonists fought the British soldiers at Lexington, Mass. Hours later in nearby Concord, colonists fired “the shot heard round the world” when they battled the British troops near a bridge. The War lasted eight years, and ended on 3 September 1783 in Paris, when the United States and Great Britain signed the final peace treaty.

AUSTIN, Samuel

AUSTIN, Samuel, of Toby Township. (Source: “Early History of PA by Iscrupe). Austin did not serve 6 months. Also: #R328, PA Line, application on 19 May 1834 in Armstrong County, PA., age 78, born 26 January 1756 in Chester County, PA and in 1783 moved to Centre County, PA. and in 1805 moved to Armstrong Co., PA. (Source: Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files. pg. 2231)

BLAIN, William

BLAIN, William, 1753 – 1827, of Sugar Creek. (Source: “Early Deaths & Marriages”, compiled by C. L. Mateer, 1996.) pg. 20.

BLAIR, Thomas

Thomas BLAIR died in Westmoreland County but his family came to Armstrong County. Register to see BLAIR under Surnames and Bible Records in the Forum.

BOYD, Daniel

BOYD, Daniel. Died, 9 April 1831 in Plumcreek Township. formerly of Redbank Township. (Early Deaths & Marriages”), pg. 91

BOYLE, Daniel

Revolutionary Pension File # S40016. Boyle, Daniel.
Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. 18 December 1820, Daniel Boyle, aged 72 years, appeared before the Court in Kittanning to apply for a pension. He testified that he enlisted for a term of two years in the spring of 1776, at Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. He was in a Company commanded by Colonel Miles and afterward by Colonel Walter Stewart. He was discharged at Valley Forge about 1 January 1778. He states he was in the battles of Brandywine & Germantown. A schedule of his real & personal estate shows the following, his necessary clothing & bedding excluded: A 100 acre tract of land for which he has no title or claim other than an improvement right. Debts due him from Joseph Mercer, Michael Buzzard, David Ramsay, Peter Lobaugh, and Algeo Sawyers. Daniel Boyle owes debts to the following: Night Scott’s heirs, Thomas Jones, Hugh McDonald, John Henry’s estate, Montieth & Pinks, and David Reynolds. He says the only part of his family who resides with him are his three daughters, Elizabeth, aged about 27; Margaret, aged about 25; and Martha, aged 19 years.

I found Daniel Boyle in 1820 living in Redbank Township, Armstrong County. It is very likely that he lived in the portion that was taken to form Clarion County in 1839. He is drawing a pension of eight dollars per month in 1828, and is still a resident of Armstrong County. A bit of research would show if he died while still living in that same place and if that place later became part of Clarion County.

BROWN, James, Sr.

BROWN, James, Sr. 1742 – 1830. From Rayburn Township, buried in Kittanning Cemetery. (Source: Cemetery Record, Veterans Record (newspaper), and “Early Deaths & Marriages”. And from the “Boston Evening Transcript” of 22 November 1830. Under “Deaths”: In Kittanning, PA. Mr. James Brown, 88, much respected by all who knew him. He served three years and six months in the Revolutionary War. A soldier who had taken his place in the battle of Brandywine for a few minutes, till he could put his flint in order so as to strike fire, was in the meantime killed; also one fell on his right hand in the same battle. Revolutionary Pension file # S 40.750: James Brown, Sr. “In 1825, aged 78 years, a resident of Kittanning, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, and wife Mary. Died November 6, 1830.” The pension file mentions that he was a carpenter. In September 1820, before the court in Kittanning, he states that wife Mary is about 68 years of age, his children are grown and married, but youngest son Robert was lately married and yet resides with them, to take care of his father and his aged and infirm mother. Pension file states he enlisted in Lancaster County on December 1776, for three years & six months, in the 12th Pennsylvania Regiment, a part of the Continental Army. Regiment was reduced and he was drafted into the 3rd Pennsylvania Regiment.

BROWN, John

BROWN, John. #S22145, PA Line, soldier was born in 1760 at Hopewell Township in New Jersey and enlisted in Bedford Co., PA. Application on 18 September 1833. In Armstrong Co. PA at the age of 73, after the war the soldier lived in Mifflin Co., PA for 10 years then to Armstrong Co., PA. (Source: Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files, pg. 2231). Also residing in Armstrong Co., in 1819. (Source: Penna. Archives, 2nd Series, Vol XIII, pg. 24)
Revolutionary pension file: Resided at Big Cove, Bedford County, Pennsylvania, at enlistment. Was a resident of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania in 1833.

BROWNLEE, Joseph

Joseph Brownlee Claim # W. 3245. Elizabeth Guthrie who first married Capt. Brownlee and then married Capt. Guthrie who served in the Revolutionary War. The data which follows was obtained from papers on file in the pension claim of Joseph Brownlee. While serving in Hannastown, Westmoreland Co., PA, Joseph Brownlee married in 1775, 76, or 77, Elizabeth, whose maiden name was not given. He enlisted in the spring of 1776 as a Lieutenant in Capt. Joseph Irwin’s company of Riflemen in Col. Miles’ Pennsylvania regiment. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Long Island, was exchanged and attached to Col. Stewart’s and Brodhead’s Pennsylvania regiments and was stationed at Fort Pitt and Laurens. Because of an injury in the foot he left the service in 1779 and resided at Hannastown until July, 1782, when the town was destroyed by the Indians and he and his little son, whom he was carrying in his arms, were killed by the Indians at or near Miller’s Fort. His wife, Elizabeth, and child, Jane, were captured and taken to Buffalo and Niagara, where the wife was sold to a British officer for twenty dollars and the child for ten dollars and two gallons of rum. Elizabeth was then sent as a captive to Montreal, was exchanged and returned with the child to Hannastown in July, 1783. (I doubt that Joseph Brownlee ever lived in Armstrong Co. but Elizabeth went on to marry William Guthrie, and they lived in Armstrong Co. See William Guthrie for more.)

BUYERS, George

BUYERS, George, residing in Armstrong County in 1813. On 1 Feb. 1777, Buyer was wounded at Princeton. (Penna. Archives, 2nd Series Vol. XIII, pg. 29.) #S40768, PA. Line. Application on 13 April 1818 in Armstrong Co., PA. In 1820 soldier was age 63 and a resident of Sugar Creek Township, PA and wife Susannah who died about 1817. Buyers was living with son George Buyers and also part time living with a married daughter Jane and also mentioned another married child (not named). (Source: Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files, pg. 2231)

CARUTHERS, James

CARUTHERS, James. 1754 – 1846. Buried in the Old Presbyterian Cemetery in Cowanshannock Township. (Source, Cemetery Records)

CLARK, James

CLARK, James. Clark is buried in Wasson Hill Cemetery in Plumcreek Township. (Source: Cemetery Records, Veterans)

CLARK, John

Revolutionary War Pension File #S41484. Major John CLARK, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. March 1776, John CLARK was appointed 1st Lieutenant of Captain John MARSHALL’s Company, Colonel MILE’s Rifle Regiment, where he served one year. He was afterwards appointed Captain in Colonel Walter STEWART’s 13th Pennsylvania Regiment. CLARK was Captain of Colonel Daniel BRODHEAD’s 8th Pennsylvania Regiment and was commissioned as Brevet Major at Princetown, New Jersey, 10 October 1783. He served as a Major under General Arthur ST. CLAIR and was wounded 4 November 1791. He entered the service as a Major under General Anthony WAYNE and served three years in the Indian Wars. He was allowed pension on his application dated 25 April 1818, a resident of Armstrong County, aged 69, infirm and in reduced circumstances, with his application sworn and declared before William JACK. Signed: William JACK, Judge of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. John CLARK

9 November 1818. John CLARK certifies that he never received any answer to his request to be put on the pension list. He stated: “I prefer my claim for a Pension, it was in consequence of the wound I received at St. CLAIR’s defeat–4th November 1791.” Signed: John CLARK. Sworn and subscribed before Henry A. WEAVER, Armstrong County.

Joseph CLARK, heir at law of Major John CLARK, deceased, appoints S. M. HOSEY of Freeport, Armstrong County, to act as agent to try and obtain any amount of Revolutionary War Pension for the heirs of Major John CLARK.
22 February 1854, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania
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PENSION ROLL OF 1835, THE MID-ATLANTIC STATES. ARMSTRONG COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA
CLARK, John, 5th. Major.
Annual Allowance: $240.00
Sums Received: $446.58
Description of Service: Pennsylvania Continental Line
Placed on Pension Roll: 8 July 1819
Commencement of Pension: 25 April 1818
Age: 85 (sic)

Note: We have yet to discover if this John Clark is buried in Armstrong County.

CRAIG, John

CRAIG, John. 1753 – 1850. Buried in the Ancient Freeport Cemetery in South Buffalo Township. (Source: Cemetery Record, Veterans) John Craig’s pension number is S8253, PA. Line. John Craig was born in 1753 in New Jersey and lived in Derry Township in Westmoreland Co., PA at his enlistment. His application was dated 18 June 1834 in Armstrong Co., PA. He was a resident of Buffalo Township, PA where he moved in 1796, a daughter is mentioned, but not named.

CRAIG, Samuel

CRAIG, Samuel. He was a Lieutenant in July 1776, in Col. John Proctor’s Battalion of Westmoreland County Militia. He was killed by the Indians in 1777. Samuel and 3 sons served: John, Alexander, and Samuel Jr. Not sure if Samuel ever lived in Armstrong Co., more research needed here.

Additional information found in an old letter dated 7 Dec. 1898. It stated that Samuel Craig was comissioned as lieutenant in July 1776 in Col. John Proctor’s Battalion of Westmoreland Co. He was killed by the Indians in 1777. This paper is signed by Dr. Engle, State Librarian and Editor of Penna. Archives. Below the information of Craig’s service was written, “Exhibit A” and on the back of the paper, “Verified.”

An old diary was found among other old papers at Ligonier and in the entry for Nov. 4th, 1777, was the record that a scouting party had found Samuel Craig’s bay mare lying dead on the Chestnut Ridge and as he could not be found it was supposed that he had been taken prisoner by the Indians as he was on his way to Fort Ligonier for salt the Saturday before. This diary or journal, as it was called, was kept by a Thomas Galbreath, one of the authorities at Fort Ligonier. We were greatly interested in this record as it corresponded so well with the family tradition concerning him, but we did not before know the exact date of his catpure. Samuel Craig and three of his sons, John, Alexander and Samuel served in the Revolution. In Volume 10 of the Second Series, page 687 (or 66) I find the name of John Craig as a private in the 9th Penna. Regt. of the Continental Line. Following his name is the record, “He died in Armstrong Co. in 1832, aged 81″. The company is not given, just a list of the men of the regiment.`

CRISWELL, Matthew

CRISWELL, Matthew. Buried in Cowansville Cemetery, East Franklin Township. (Source: Cemetery Record, Veterans)

DAVIS, Ebenezer

DAVIS, Ebenezer. 1753 – 1818. Buried in Cowansville Cemetery in East Franklin Township. (Source: Cemetery Record, Veterans)

DICKASON, Samuel

Revolutionary War Pension File #W285. Samuel and Elizabeth DICKASON.
Samuel DICKASON enlisted about 25 December 1777, at Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware. He served until April 1780, in Captain COLE’s Company, Colonel McLANE’s Regiment. He was a teamster. In 1780, he served in Captain ROSS’s Pennsylvania Company, enlisting at George’s Creek, Fayette County, Pennsylvania. He was a resident of Buffalo Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, in 1832, where he received a pension. He was then aged 80 years. He moved to Georgetown, Ohio, where he lived from 1836 to 1838. Some of his children were living there at that time. He returned to Armstrong County where he died 16 April 1846, in Buffalo Township.

He married Elizabeth CLUGSTAN on 1 November 1814, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Elizabeth applied for a pension in Armstrong County, where she resided, on 14 June 1853. She was then aged 89 years and the pension was granted.

EASLY, Casper

EASLY, Casper. 1760 – 1829 from Freeport. (Source: John F. Easley, family tradition)

ECKMAN, Eden

ECKMAN, Eden. Buried in Riverview Cemetery in Kiskiminetas Township (Source: Veterans Affairs)

ELGIN, James

ELGIN, James. 1750 – 1857. Buried in St. Thomas / Gastown Cemetery in Plumcreek Township. (Source: Cemetery Records, Veterans, and Church Cemetery.)

FINDLAY, David

FINDLAY, David. Residing in Armstrong Co. in 1810. (Source: Penna. Archives, 2nd Series Vol. XIII, pg. 69)

FISCUS, Abraham

Revolutionary War Pension File #W2778. Abraham and Catharine FISCUS. Abraham FISCUS appeared before the Court in Kittanning on 17 September 1832, aged 72 and a resident of Plumcreek Township, Armstrong County. He states: He was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1760. He lived about seven miles from Greensburg, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, when he entered the service, but since the war has resided in Plumcreek Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. He volunteered under Captain Jeremiah LOUGHRY at Colonel Archibald LOUGHRY’s Blockhouse, Westmoreland County, in April 1777 or 1778. The 1st Lieutenant was John GUTHRIE and 2nd Lieutenant was James IRWIN. He stated that persons known to him in the present neighborhood in Armstrong County are: George BECK, James and John RICHARD, Absalom WOODWARD of Crooked Creek; and Richard GRAHAM. Children mentioned are William FISCUS and Margaret HUNTER. Abraham FISCUS died 30 April 1834 in Armstrong County. His widow Catharine FISCUS appeared before the Court in Kittanning on 21 March 1842. She was then 75 years of age. She declared she was married to Abraham FISCUS in September 1784, by Reverend William WEAVER, pastor of the German Reformed Congregation of Westmoreland County. John McCULLOUGH, now of Butler County, Pennsylvania, was present at the wedding. She states that her oldest son William was then (1842) 56 years old.

1853. Samuel FISCUS of Armstrong County, aged 36, goes before the Court in Kittanning to say he was well acquainted with Abraham and Catharine FISCUS, who resided with his parents. He states that Catharine died at her son William’s residence in Armstrong County in September or October 1845, leaving seven children surviving:

Abraham FISCUS, aged about 62 years. Twin to Catharine.
Catharine BROWN, widow, aged about 62 years. Twin to Abraham.
William FISCUS, aged about 68 years.
Philip FISCUS, aged about 50 years.
Christena GOULD, aged about 5? years.
Margaret HUNTER, aged about 54 years.
Polly AYRES, aged about 65 years.

Note: Rev. William Weaver is most likely Rev. Wilhelm Weber.

Among the papers of Abraham Fiscus is a sworn statement from Gabriel A. Richart, a resident of Armstrong County and a Clergyman who certifies “that he is well acquainted with Fiscus and believes his declaration that he was a soldier of the Revolutionary War”. Sworn in open Court (Armstrong County) on the 21st day of March A.D. 1833.

GARY, Richard

Revolutionary War Pension File #R3933. Richard GARY aka Gary DICK.
15 March 1824, Richard GARY, aged 69 and a resident of Buffalo Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, appeared before the Court in Kittanning to apply for a pension. He appeared before the Court again on 18 September 1832, then aged 81 (sic) and still a resident of Buffalo Township. He had enlisted March 1776 in Baltimore, Maryland. He states that while in the Army he was called Gary DICK.

I do not have proof that he is buried in Armstrong County. At the Union Baptist Church Cemetery in North Buffalo Township, Armstrong County, there is a tombstone for Mary GEARY, wife of Richard GEARY, died 3 February 1856. Her age was illegible. There is also a tombstone for John GEARY, died 11 April 1871, aged 69 years 10 months ? days. John Geary’s wife has a tombstone and there is a James GEARY that died in 1863, aged 26 years.

GEARY, see GARY

Revolutionary soldier Richard Gary is possibly Richard Geary. He served under the name Gary Dick.

GIBSON, Gideon

GIBSON, Gideon. Buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery in Parker, Armstrong Co. Also served in the Indian Wars. (Source: Cemetery Records, Veterans. And “Early History of PA.” by Iscrupe.) Gibson was born on 3 March 1764 in Cumberland Co., PA.; he died on 10 February 1843. Wife was Abigail and they were married on 5 July 1804 in Venango, Butler Co.
While a resident of Snake Spring Valley, Bedford Co., PA, Gideon enlisted three times and served with Capt. John Moore’s PA Company at Moore’s Fort, guarding the frontier against the Indians. After the war, he moved to Westmoreland Co. then to Washington Co, and in 1799 to Armstrong Co. He applied for pension on 17 December 1834, while a resident of Perry Twp., Armstrong Co. His claim was not allowed as frontier service against Indians was not pensionable under the Act of 7 June 1832, under which he applied. In the Armstrong County Court, a number of documents were sworn to prove that Gideon Gibson was in the revolutionary War in addition to the Indian Wars. George Gideon (not a relative) swore in Armstrong Co. that Gideon was in the same Company as he was and at the same time. Pension claim, R. 3993 was finally awarded to his widow. (Source: Gideon’s Rev. War Pension Records)

GIBSON, Samuel M.

GIBSON, Samuel M. Buried at Brick Church Cemetery in Burrell Twp. (Source: Veterans Affairs.)

GREEN, John

GREEN, John. 1766 – 1850. Buried in the Green Cemetery in North Buffalo Township. (Source: Cemetery Records, Veterans and Church Cemetery.)

GREEN, William

GREEN, William. 1740 – 1830. Buried in Green Cemetery in North Buffalo Township. (Source: Cemetery Records, Veterans and Church Cemetery.)

GUTHREY, William

GUTHREY, William. Died 1828. (Source: Penna. Archives, 2nd Series Vol. XIII, pg. 89) Elizabeth Brownlee married in July, 1784, William Guthrie of Hannastown, Westmoreland Co. He enlisted in Cumberland County, PA, in May 1776, in Capt. James McConnel’s Pennsylvania company of the flying camp, was in the battles of Trenton and Princeton and was discharged in January, 1777. He enlisted in 1780 and served as lieutenant in Capt. Mathew Jack’s company of Pennsylvania rangers, and he served another year as Captain of a company of rangers. After the close of the Revolutionary War, William and Elizabeth Guthrie moved to that part of Westmoreland Co. which was later called Armstrong Co. and he was killed by a fall from a wagon on 10 March, 1828, at which time he was 73 years of age.

Elizabeth, the widow of William Guthrie, died on 11 Feb. 1842, in or near Redbank Twp., Clarion Co., PA. at the home of her son, Joseph Brownlee Guthrie, and she was then 87 years of age. She was survived by the following children: James Guthrie, Joanna or Johanna Guthrie who lived in Jefferson Co., PA, and Joseph Brownlee Guthrie and William Guthrie who lived in Clarion Co., PA. In 1849 it was stated that Jane (the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Brownlee) had married Jesse Hukel and had moved to Muskingum Co., Ohio, and that the family did not know whether she was then living or dead, as they had not heard from her for 8 years. Said Jane was 4 years old in 1786. On 25 June, 1847, the above-noted Joseph Brownlee Guthrie applied for pension that was due the surviving children of Elizabeth Guthrie, on account of the Revolutionary War service of Joseph Brownlee and the claim was allowed.

In 1847, Sarah Beatty, aged 84 years and a resident of North Buffalo Twp., Armstrong Co., PA., stated that she was the sister of Elizabeth Guthrie and that her father (name not given) moved to the vicinity of Hannastown, PA., before the Revolutionary War. She did not give the date and place of birth of her father nor his place of residence before moving to Hannastown. Said Sarah married William Beatty, 8 July 1783. In 1847 ___ Beatty of Armstrong Co., who married John Beatty 31 December 1789, stated that she was the sister of Elizabeth Guthrie and she stated that when the Indians killed Joseph Brownlee they killed her bother (name not given) at the same place. No further family data. (Pension Claim of Joseph Brownlee # W. 3245.

HANCOCK, Cutlope

Revolutionary Pension File #S22281. Cutlope HANCOCK was a resident of Allegheny Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, living in the section that became Kiskiminetas Township. He moved there prior to 1800, as he stated it was Westmoreland County at the time of his move. At one time, he operated a ferry across the Kiskiminetas River in the area of Edmon. He and his wife Magdalena lived in the general vicinity of Maysville, Kiskiminetas Township. They could have been buried on their property, but most likely they are interred in the old Maysville Graveyard on the hill. It is my personal belief that this cemetery was started as a family graveyard for Soloman Dunmire and his wife Margaret Hancock, who was most likely a daughter of Cutlope.

10 December 1832. Cutlope HANCOCK appeared before the Court in Kittanning to apply for a pension. He was at that time a resident of Kiskiminetas Township, previously Allegheny Township, Armstrong County. He stated that he was then aged 93 years; he was born in Germany in 1739 or 1740; he was living in Cranberry, Middlesex County, New Jersey when called into service; that he moved to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania about 40 years ago, where he lived near Greensburg for 3 or 4 months and then moved to the Loyalhanna Creek. He testified that he moved to Armstrong County after a year or two, but it was then part of Westmoreland County (Armstrong was formed in 1800). He named Rev. Gabriel Adam REICHERT and Jacob WOLF as persons in his neighborhood who could testify to his character and veracity.

Article by Wayne C. Ehrensberger

HARMON, Andrew

HARMON, Andrew. Died 1855, buried at Sagamore Lutheran Cemetery in Cowanshannock Twp.

HARTMAN, Michael

Revolutionary War Pension File #W3680. 20 June 1825, Michael HARTMAN, aged 65, appeared before the Court in Kittanning to apply for pension. Being sworn, he declared that he enlisted as a private soldier at Frederickstown, Maryland for a period of three years, about 1777 or 1778, in Captain Michael BOYER’s Company, Colonel WELTNER’s German Battalion, Maryland Line of the Continental Army. Was at Valley Forge when the troops lay in winter quarters there; was at White Plains; served in the expedition against the Indians at Wyoming (Pennsylvania) commanded by General SULLIVAN; served at Yorktown and the capture of CORNWALLIS; marched to Charlestown, South Carolina, where he and the company shipped to Annapolis, Maryland and were discharged. On the way to attack the Indians as before mentioned, while the troops lay at Easton, Pennsylvania, he reenlisted for the duration of the war, which he served. He is a farmer on rented land. His sons have left and work for themselves and are in low circumstances. Two daughters live with him and work to support themselves. His wife is nearly 60 and neither of them can work on account of their age.

17 June 1845, Elizabeth, widow of Michael HARTMAN, aged 88 of Kittanning Township, Armstrong County, appeared before the Court in Kittanning. She declared she is the widow of Michael HARTMAN and they were married 10 February 1784 in Frederickstown, Maryland, by Reverend George COOK. The only person she knows living who was present at the marriage is Mary EVANS, a relative now living in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. Michael HARTMAN died 5 April 1845 (in Kittanning Township). John HARTMAN declares he is the oldest son of Michael & Elizabeth and he is aged 60 years.

13 December 1853–William HARTMAN, son and heir of Michael & Elizabrth, deceased, applies for pension.

Mentions youngest son Michael HARTMAN married in 1824.
…………………………………………..
Pensioners from the 1840 Federal Census, Revolutionary or Military Service, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania
HARTMAN, Michael ~ Age 81 ~ Kittanning Township, Armstrong County
…………………………………………………………………
Pension Roll of 1835, The Mid-Atlantic States. Armstrong County, Pennsylvania
HARTMAN, Michael, Private
Annual Allowance: $96.00
Sums Received: $803.35
Description of Service: WELTNER’s G[erman] Regiment
Placed on Pension Roll: 8 November 1825
Commencement of Pension: 23 October 1825

Michael HARTMAN is listed as a Revolutionary pensioner in Armstrong County, Her People Past and Present by J. H. Beers & Company, page 66.

Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania Courthouse Records, Will Abstracts.
HARTMAN, John of Hempfield Township. He mentions his mother and father and his sisters. He mentions one sister by name, Polly EAVENS, wife of Walter EAVENS. He names Jacob PAINTER Esq. and Jacob MECHLING, Sr. as Executors. Written 15 October 1802 and proved 30 October 1802. Will Book 1, page 172.

Note: Because Molly and Polly are often nicknames for Mary, I thought this Polly EAVENS might be the Mary EVANS of Westmoreland County who is mentioned in the Revolutionary pension of Michael HARTMAN.

HEILMAN, Peter

HEILMAN, Peter. 1749 – 1833. Buried in the Heilman Cemetery in Kittanning Township. (Source: Cemetery Records)

“According to historical publications, Peter HEILMAN came to America in 1750 from Alsace-Lorraine at the age of two. His mother had died aboard ship during the passage. He and his father, Christian HEILMAN, landed in Philadelphia and settled in Northampton County. Both Christian and Peter served in the Revolutionary War, and it is assumed that Chriatian was buried in Northampton County. In 1800, either in a lottery or in lieu of pay for military services, 200 acres of land was granted to Peter HEILMAN, near Blanket Hill, Kittanning Township. HEILMAN and his wife had eight children. Two of the boys walked from Northampton, in eastern part of the state, to Armstrong County, to see what kind of land they owned. In 1961, the Daughters of the American Revolution, Kittanning Chapter, dedicated the grave of the soldier and placed a marker there. There were 200 persons at the ceremony.”

Newspaper article “Revolutionary Veterans Buried in Armstrong County”. Leader-Times, Kittanning. Thursday, 25 May 197_. (The last number is worn.)

This newspaper article doesn’t cite sources and you should always check these facts for yourself.

HELFRICH, George

HELFRICH, George. 1762 – 1833. Buried at the Old Shaffer Cemetery in Burrell Twp.

HENDERSON, Benjamin

HENDERSON, Benjamin. 1766 – 1857. Buried in St. Thomas / Gastown Cemetery in Plumcreek Twp.

KELLY, Alexander

KELLY, Alexander. 1769 – 1844. Alexander is buried in the Crooked Creek Cemetery in Bethel Twp.

KING, George Adam

KING, George Adam. 1765 – 1843. King is buried in the Bush Cemetery in Burrell Twp. (Source: Christine Crawford Oppenheimer)

KING, John

KING, John. Private, 2nd Regiment, PA Continental Army. King was in Maj. John Murray’s Company under Col. Walter Stewart. He was age 29, 5 feet and 5 inches tall; his occupation was a butcher; born in Annapolis (town), Maryland. On the roll dated 9 September 1778. Certificate dated 29 Oct. 1784, pay for 1 Aug. 1780 to 1 Jan. 1781 was $33.00. From the PA Archives, 5th Serics; Vol. IV, pp. 501 – 502. Revolutionary War Declarations, Armstrong Co., PA. 6 March 1813 – Robert Beaty, Guy Hiccox, David Crawford, Samuel Matthews, John Gillespie, Robert Brown, Hacey Jack all testify that John King was in Capt. Spear’s Company under command of Col. Steward of 2nd PA. Regiment, and is now a resident of Kittanning Twp. in Armstrong Co. (Source: “Western PA. Genealogical Society Quarterly”, May 1981. Volume 7, number 4.)

KING, Jonathan

KING, Jonathan. 1757 – 1837. Resided in Sugar Creek Township. (Early Deaths & Marriages, pg. 50)

Revoltionary Pension File # S13645. King, Jonathan.
19 September 1832. Jonathan King, a resident of Sugarcreek Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, appeared before the Court in Kittanning to make sworn declarations in order to obtain a Revolutionary War Pension. He said he was born in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, in 1757. He has the record of his age in his father’s handwriting, taken from his father’s bible. He had lived in Northampton County until 1794, when he moved to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. He stayed there five years and then came to Armstrong County.

The Pension File states that he fought in no battles during the War. He enlisted for 6 months as a Private under Captain John Santee of the Flying Camp, March 1776. In April 1880, he served as a Lieutenant for 3 1/2 months under Captain George Nulff. Jonathan King died 14 June 1837.

Jacob Wolff was one of the men who appeared before the Court in Kittanning to testify as to Jonathan King’s character. Jacob Wolff said that he “lived within three quarters of a mile of the applicant Jonathan King from childhood”. They entered the service together in March 1776, in the Flying Camp under Captain John Santee at Easton, Northampton County, Pennsylvania. Source: Revolutionary War Pension File #S13645, King, Jonathan.

Note: Jacob Wolff was married to Christina King. Kathy Marcinek

PENSION ROLL OF 1835, THE MID-ATLANTIC STATES. ARMSTRONG COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA
KING, Jonathan, Private & Lieutenant
Annual Allowance: $66.65
Sums Received: $199.95
Description of Service: Pennsylvania Militia
Placed on Pension Roll: 15 July 1833
Commencement of Pension: 4 March 1831
Age: 77

Another source is the published Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, Volume IV, page 501. Continental Line, Pension Applications, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Brady’s Bend Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania.
“Adjoining the Spangler-McCall tract on the south is a similar one, 400 acres, the warrant for which was granted to James C. CAMPBELL, a portion of whose land history is given in the sketch of Sugar Creek Township, a considerable portion of its southern part being still in that township. The warrantee’s interest became vested in Charles CAMPBELL. It’s original settler was Jonathan KING, who was assesed with 200 acres, 1 horse and 3 cattle in 1804, at $148, and with the same and an additional horse the next year, at $158. He was residing on this tract when he was elected the second sheriff of this county in 1808.” “He was in his early life a soldier of the Revolutionary War, and was at the time of his death, which occured here June 16, 1837, aged 79 years, 8 months and 14 days.”

Source: History of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania by Robert Walter Smith, Esq. Chicago, Waterman, Watkins & Company, 1883. Page 565
Revoltionary Pension File # S13645. King, Jonathan.
19 September 1832. Jonathan King, a resident of Sugarcreek Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, appeared before the Court in Kittanning to make sworn declarations in order to obtain a Revolutionary War Pension. He said he was born in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, in 1757. He has the record of his age in his father’s handwriting, taken from his father’s bible. He had lived in Northampton County until 1794, when he moved to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. He stayed there five years and then came to Armstrong County.

The Pension File states that he fought in no battles during the War. He enlisted for 6 months as a Private under Captain John Santee of the Flying Camp, March 1776. In April 1880, he served as a Lieutenant for 3 1/2 months under Captain George Nulff. Jonathan King died 14 June 1837.

KING, Mathias

KING, Mathias. 1730 – 1810.
Mathias King is not buried in Armstrong County. In 1922, some descendants put up a monument to him and his family at Brick Church, Burrell Township, making it appear that he is buried there, but descendants today say he most likely is not. He died in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where his will was filed, and he is probably buried there. I have found sources that say he is definately buried in Westmoreland County.

KIRKPATRICK, James

KIRKPATRICK, James. Served 4 months. (Source: “Early History of PA” by Iscrupe. Resided in Wayne Twp.
Source: Revolutionary War Pension File #R5992:
James Kirkpatrick was born 25 September 1754, in the place that later became Shippensburg, Pennsylvania. He applied for a pension 16 June 1835, while a resident of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. He alleged the following: That while living in Shippensburg, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, he enlisted 7 July 1776, and served as 1st Sergeant in Captain Robert Culbertson’s Pennsylvania Regiment; that sometime in the fall of 1776 he moved to Westmoreland County and resided there until Armstrong County was formed from parts of Westmoreland & Lycoming Counties, and has since resided in Armstrong County, except for a period of seven years during which he resided in Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania, and that he now (1835) lives in Wayne Township, Armstrong County. He states he was called into service on 20 August 1778, and served as an ensign in Captain Marchant’s Company, Colonel Gibson’s Regiment, and was discharged 20 October 1778, and returned home. He then enlisted in February 1780, at Pittsburgh, and served as ensign in Captain Samuel Love’s Pennsylvania Company against the Cherokee Indians at Cuyahoga. He states he was discharged 24 April 1780. After the Revolutionary War he lived in Armstrong County, except for a period of seven years during which he resided in Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Soldier was dead in 1853 and survived by a son Moses. No other family is mentioned in the pension claim. His claim was not allowed as he failed to provide proof of service.
(He gives a very detailed account of his service, but the claim was still denied.)
James Kirkpatrick, upwards of 80 years of age, appeared before the Court in Kittanning in 1835. Here are some of the sworn statements he made upon his oath of his service after moving to Westmoreland County: In 1778, he was in a Company of Militia commanded by Dr. Marchand, Captain. They were stationed on the south of the Monongahela River to protect men sawing timber under Colonel Gibson’s direction. Kirkpatrick went out as often as two or three times a week on scouting parties, looking for Indians. Captain Miller was scouting to Fort Hand with eleven of his men. Near Fort Hand and Hannastown, near where he resided, he and ten men were killed by Indians, one escaping. Kirkpatrick and others were discharged 20 October 1778 and returned home. February 1780, men of different companies were to go on an expedition against the Indians. Kirkpatrick was in a Company commanded by Samuel Love. Peter Thomas of Sewickley was Lieutenant and Kirkpatrick was Ensign. There was one company of Continentals, one company of Virginia Militia, and several companies of Pennsylvania Militia, with General Hand having chief command. The troops set out for Cuyahoga, going down the Ohio and up Big Beaver, Simon Girty acting as pilot. Came to an Indian Town and killed an Indian who first wounded a Captain of the Continentals “and killed them a few boys & the Virginians killed them a few squaws”. Deponent Kirkpatrick and John Denniston and Samuel Mahaffey took one squaw prisoner and saved her life.

LEECH, Archibald

I have no proof that Archibald Leech is buried in Armstrong County but it is likely, since he was living here as an old man and his wife died here. Archibald Leech enlisted at Hannastown, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, in the spring of 1776, and served as a private in Captain Joseph’s Irwin’s Company in a Pennsylvania Regiment commanded at various times by Colonels Miles, Brodhead, and Walter Stewart. He was honorably discharged by Colonel Walter Stewart at Valley Forge in January 1778. He first marched from Hannastown to Marcus Hook, and fought in the battles of Long Island, White Plain, Brandywine and Germantown, and in several skirmishes. On 18 December 1820, Archibald Leech was a resident of Allegheny Township, Armstrong County. He appeared in court there to request a pension for his Revolutionary service. At that time, he stated that his wife had been dead “upwards of one year”. On oath, he says he is a farmer, that he rents a small farm of about five acres of cleared land with a small cabin house. He states: “My family consists of a niece of about 21 or 22 years of age called Susanna Hindman, whom I raised from the time she was two weeks old her mother dying at this time”. He says he has no other family whatsoever. His assets were listed as one house, valued at $30.00, and three sheep, valued at three dollars each.
Source: Archibald Leech, Revolutionary Pension file # S 40.935

LEONARD, Patrick

LEONARD, Patrick. 1747 – 1811. Buried at Cowansville Union First in East Franklin Twp.

LEWIS, Ezekiel

LEWIS, Ezekiel. Buried at Cowansville Union in East Franklin Township.

Ezekiel Lewis was part of an expedition called Lochry’s Disaster. Robert Orr, later a judge in Kittanning, was a Captain from Hannastown who raised and equipped a small company of riflemen that was also involved in this disaster. There has been a lot written about the destruction of this detachment of Lochry’s. I suggest Old Westmoreland: A History of Western Pennsylvania During The Revolution by Edgar W. Hassler. You can probably also find a lot by Googling “Lochry’s Disaster” or a variation of that.

Source: Revoltionary Pension File #S4533. Before the Court in Kittanning, Armstrong County, Ezekiel Lewis testified to the folowing:
That he was born in Schannadore (Shannadoah?) County, Virginia, in the year 1755.
That this record was kept in his grandfather’s bible in said county. The bible went to his grandfather’s son Morici Lewis, who is since dead.
He states he lived in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, when he volunteered for the Revolution, that he lived there nine years and since that time he has lived in Sugarcreek Township, Armstrong County.
He served under Colonel Archibald Lochry and William Campbell, Captain of Lighthorse, joining 1 August 1781. On 24 August 1781, he was “taken by the Indians on their way from Sugarcreek in Westmoreland County in this state to the mouth of the Big Myami.” He was kept prisoner until July 1782, at Prison Island on the River St. Lawrence. He states that “I was not joined with any Continental Company as before stated unless Captain Thomas Stokely’s Company, but I know that Col Lochry was under General Clark when we were to meet at Wheeling, Virginia, who had left Wheeling when we arrived there, who left directions for us to follow him down the Ohio River, which we were doing accordingly when taken by the Indians.” He also mentions that his Captain was killed by the Indians.

LONG, John

LONG, John. Buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery in Plumcreek Township.

MAXWELL, Adam

MAXWELL, Adam. S5064, PA Line. Maxwell was born in 1752 in Cumberland Co., PA. and he lived in Westmoreland Co., PA. when he enlisted. He lived there after the Revolutionary War then moved to Armstrong Co., PA. where he applied for pension on 19 Sept. 1832. Maxwell’s widow Elizabeth Maxwell received final payment on 8 May 1838 and was paid to 17 May 1837, the day Adam Maxwell died. (Source: “Revolutionary War Pension Files”)

McCONELL, William

William McConell from Plumcreek Township, died on 28 Sept 1834 at the age of 81. The deceased was a Revolutionary War Soldier.
Source: Newspaper obituary, 1 October 1834.

William McCONNELL. Revolutionary Pension file. William McCONNELL, aged 63, of Redbank Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, made oath on 30 September 1818 to Judge Robert ORR. He stated he enlisted 14 November 1775 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, serving one year under Anthony WAYNE. They marched to Saratoga, New York, where McCONNELL was left due to ill health. There he enlisted again in the First Regiment of New York, serving 6 years and 6 months. He appeared before the Court in Kittanning again on 18 September 1820. He was allowed pension on the 1818 claim. His wife was named Martha.

19 December 1827. Re William McCONNELL. Washington Bounty Land Office to Honorable Robert ORR. They find Land Warrant #7506 issued to Sam BROWNE, assignee for William McCONNELL, 11 November 1791. Signed: Robert TAYLOR

Pension Roll of 1835, The Mid-Atlantic States. Armstrong County, Pennsylvania
McCONNELL, William. Private.
Annual allowance: $96.00
Sums Received: $1433.29
Description of Service: New York Continental Line
Placed on Pension Rolls: 8 May 1819
Commencement of Pensio: 30 September 1818
Age: 79

McCOY, Daniel

McCOY, Mr. (possibly Daniel). His wife’s name was Deborah and she died on 22 Oct. 1829. (Source: “Early Deaths & Marriages” compiled by C. Mateer.)

Revolutionary War Pension File #S40985. Daniel McCOY.
Daniel McCOY was a private in Colonel Miles Pennsylvania Regiment and was inscribed on the Roll of Pennsylvania at the rate of eight (8) dollars per month, to commence 8 June 1818, after he appeared before the Court in Kittanning to apply for a pension on that same date. On 27 June 1820, Daniel McCOY, aged 67, appeared before the Court in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, to apply for a pension under an Act of Congress of 18 March 1818, and an Act of Congress of 1 May 1820. He was said to then be a resident of that county. He states his wife Deborah is aged 65.

Daniel McCOY was allowed pension on his 1818 application, made while a resident of Armstrong County, and he was sent the arrears. He was a weaver by trade but unable to work. Daniel and Deborah McCOY were living in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, in 1820, and Daniel died 30 January 1821. It says he died ‘place unknown’ on one page but there is a letter written on 10 April 1851, from Alexander Taylor of Pittsburgh, on behalf of the heirs who claim he died in Armstrong County about 1828. A Certificate of Pension issued 10 July 1820 for Daniel McCOY was sent to James M. Kelly, Agent, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

As the heirs made inquiry to the pension 30 years after Daniel’s death, it is possible they are mistaken about where he died, although he could have returned to Armstrong County and died while there. More research is needed. Indiana County Historical Society could be checked to see if he is on their list of Soldier Burials. It appears to me that he did die in 1821, not 1828. Connie Mateer’s excellent source has Deborah dying in Armstrong County in 1829, so it is a real possibility they didn’t stay in Indiana County and returned here. Does anyone know for certain?

McDONALD, Joseph

McDONALD, Joseph. 1760 – 1844. Resided in Franklin Twp. Served at the end of the Revolution. (Source: “Early Deaths & Marriages. pg. 84.)

McKEE, Andrew

McKEE, Andrew. Buried at Cowansville Union First in East Franklin Township.

MURPHY, Samuel

MURPHY, Samuel. 1757 – 1851. Buried at Murphy’s Bottom in Buffalo Twp. Pension claim # 22413. Samuel Murphy was born 12 May 1758 in Frederick Co., Virginia. The names of his parents were not given. While residing on Jacobs Creek in what was then Bedford Co, he enlisted in Westmoreland Co. in the year 1775 in Capt. John Stevenson’s company, marched to Winchester, Virginia, to Williamsburg and then to Suffolk where he joined Col. Peter Muhlenberg’s 8th Virginia Regiment and went to Charleston, South Carolina and was there the day that “Independence” was declared, length of service one year. He enlisted in 1777 and marched in Capt. Robert Bell’s company to Fort Pitt, and there joined Col. John Gibson’s 13th Virginia regiment and was in the battle of Portsmouth, length of service three years. He enlisted in 1781 and served in Capt. Benjamin Field’s company in Gen. Clark’s (?) expedition to the Falls of the Ohio. On 13 Sept. 1781 he was wounded in the left hip and captured by the Indians, carried to Detroit and in November, 1781, was sold to the British and carried to Prisoners Island, from where he escaped on 11 Jul. 1782. He served in 1792 under Capt. Guthery six months in the “State Service”: in 1793, 6 months as lieutenant in Captain Patterson’s company against the Indians; in 1794, 6 months under Capt. Denny; and in 1795 6 months as lieutenant under Capt Buckaner (?)

Samuel Murphy was allowed pension on account of his service , on his application executed 18 Sept. 1832, then living in Armstrong Co, Pennsylvania.

NEIL, Robert

NEIL, Robert. Residing in Armstrong Co. in 1814. (Source: Penna. Archives, 2nd Series, Vol. XIII, pg. 69)

NELSON, Robert

NELSON, Robert. Died in 1826. Resided in Sugarcreek Twp.

NOLDER, John

John Nolder died in 1823 in Plumcreek Twp.

ORR, Robert

Robert Orr, buried in Kittanning Cemetery, Rayburn Township.
Robert ORR. Revolutionary Pension File #S4631. On 21 September 1832, Robert ORR, aged 87, appeared before the Court in Kittanning to apply for a pension. He stated that he entered the service under Colonel Archibald LOCHREY with Captains Thomas STOKELY, William CAMPBELL and himself. About the 1st of June 1781, Robert ORR raised and commanded a company at his own expense. They marched down the Ohio and were attacked by Indians on 24 August 1781, with half the men killed, including Colonel LOCHREY, and the other half taken prisoner. Robert ORR was taken to a hospital in Detroit with a broken arm, where he stayed until the next spring. He was then sent to jail in Montreal, then to Quebec, and eventually exchanged at New York. He returned home to Hannah’s Town, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania in May 1783, only to find it had been burned by the Indians during his absence. He said he was born in the Parish of McCaskey, County Derry, Ireland. He lived at Hannah’s Town but moved to Armstrong County in 1792. He was an Associate Judge of the Court of Common Pleas for Armstrong County. He died 4 September 1833.

PONTIUS, John

John PONTIUS, buried Glade Run Presbyterian, Wayne Township.

Source: Newspaper article “Revolutionary Veterans Buried in Armstrong County”. Leader-Times, Kittanning. Thursday, 25 May 197_. (The last number is worn.)

McCOY, Daniel

Revolutionary War Pension File #S40985. Daniel McCOY.
Daniel McCOY was a private in Colonel Miles Pennsylvania Regiment and was inscribed on the Roll of Pennsylvania at the rate of eight (8) dollars per month, to commence 8 June 1818, after he appeared before the Court in Kittanning to apply for a pension on that same date. On 27 June 1820, Daniel McCOY, aged 67, appeared before the Court in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, to apply for a pension under an Act of Congress of 18 March 1818, and an Act of Congress of 1 May 1820. He was said to then be a resident of that county. He states his wife Deborah is aged 65.

Daniel McCOY was allowed pension on his 1818 application, made while a resident of Armstrong County, and he was sent the arrears. He was a weaver by trade but unable to work. Daniel and Deborah McCOY were living in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, in 1820, and Daniel died 30 January 1821. It says he died ‘place unknown’ on one page but there is a letter written on 10 April 1851, from Alexander Taylor of Pittsburgh, on behalf of the heirs who claim he died in Armstrong County about 1828. A Certificate of Pension issued 10 July 1820 for Daniel McCOY was sent to James M. Kelly, Agent, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

As the heirs made inquiry to the pension 30 years after Daniel’s death, it is possible they are mistaken about where he died, although he could have returned to Armstrong County and died while there. More research is needed. Indiana County Historical Society could be checked to see if he is on their list of Soldier Burials. It appears to me that he did die in 1821, not 1828. Connie Mateer’s excellent source has Deborah dying in Armstrong County in 1829, so it is a real possibility they didn’t stay in Indiana County and returned here. Does anyone know for certain?

McMASTER, James

Revolutionary Pension File #S7189. On 6 January 1834, James McMASTER, 83 years old of Clarion Township, Armstrong County, appeared before the court in Kittanning to apply for a pension. He declared that he volunteered in 1776 as a private under Captain Nicholas BEDDINGER and Colonel Henry SLAGLE, while at the home of Henry DARRAGH near Abbotstown, York County, Pennsylvania. Some of the other privates were John MULLEN, Alexander ADAMS, Thomas ABBOT and George KUHN. McMASTER later made Ensign and in 1781 was made Lieutenant. He was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1750 and lived near Abbotstown, York County when called into service. He moved to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania in 1793, and to Armstrong County in 1804 or 1806, where he was living in 1834.

Note: James McMaster’s place of burial is unknown at this time. Clarion Township, Armstrong County became part of Clarion County in 1839.

Pension Roll of 1835, The Mid-Atlantic States. Armstrong County, Pennsylvania
M’MASTER, James, Private
Annual Allowance: 20.00
Sums Received: ….
Description of Service: Pennsylvania State Troops
Placed on Pension Roll: 23 July 1834
Commencment of Pension: 4 March 1831
Age: 83
Comments: No report of payment made.

Note: He was placed on the pension rolls but never received payment so it’s possible he died shortly after making application. Does anyone have more information?

ORR, Robert

Robert ORR. Revolutionary Pension File #S4631. On 21 September 1832, Robert ORR, aged 87, appeared before the Court in Kittanning to apply for a pension. He stated that he entered the service under Colonel Archibald LOCHREY with Captains Thomas STOKELY, William CAMPBELL and himself. About the 1st of June 1781, Robert ORR raised and commanded a company at his own expense. They marched down the Ohio and were attacked by Indians on 24 August 1781, with half the men killed, including Colonel LOCHREY, and the other half taken prisoner. Robert ORR was taken to a hospital in Detroit with a broken arm, where he stayed until the next spring. He was then sent to jail in Montreal, then to Quebec, and eventually exchanged at New York. He returned home to Hannah’s Town, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania in May 1783, only to find it had been burned by the Indians during his absence. He said he was born in the Parish of McCaskey, County Derry, Ireland. He lived at Hannah’s Town but moved to Armstrong County in 1792. He was an Associate Judge of the Court of Common Pleas for Armstrong County. He died 4 September 1833.

Note: Hannah’s Town is also Hanna’s Town but almost always spelled Hannastown.

RAYBURN, James

Rayburn, James. The 1840 census of Pensioners for Revolutionary and Military Service lists Eleanor Rayburn, aged 72, living in Buffalo Towship. Head of household is James Rayburn, no doubt her son.
…………………
Armstrong County, Pennsylvania Courthouse Records, Will Abstracts:
RAYBURN, James of Buffalo Township, Armstrong County. Mentions his eldest son James and his heirs and assigns; his youngest son Matthew and his heirs and assigns; his daughter Mary BRANDON?; his son Callen; his beloved wife Elenor; his grandson Samuel RAYBURN, under age 21. Signed 1 June 1837. Witnesses: John REDICK and Samuel REDICK.
Registered 20 February 1838, Will Book 1, page 193.
……………….
Writing about James RAYBURN, son of Boyd: Mr. RAYBURN’S first ancestor in this country was his great-great grandfather, who came from Scotland a few years after the French & Indian War. He settled in the Ligonier Valley in Western Pennsylvania. We have record of two of his sons, Matthew and James, the former of whom served in the Colonial Army during the Revoluionary War. James, the youngest, was the great grandfather of Squire James RAYBURN. He married Nellie CALLEN, daughter of Patrick CALLEN, who came to Armstrong County at the same time as James RAYBURN.

This was taken from a larger write-up on page 374 in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, Her People, Past & Present, J. H. Beers & Co., Chicago, 1914.
……………………………………
James & Eleanor (Nellie) Rayburn lived in Buffalo Township, where she received a pension and where they are most certainly buried. The question is, was the pension for Revolutionary service by James? The census says “Revolutionary and Military Service”.

The same Beer’s History mentioned above has a listing of Revolutionary Pensioners in Armstrong County. It says they applied for an annuity from the State between 1812 and 1844, as veterans of the wars or widows of veterans. Eleanor Rayburn is listed here, on page 65.

RUPERT, Charles

Charles RUPERT, buried in the Rupert Cemetery, South Buffalo Township.

Source: Newspaper article “Revolutionary Veterans Buried in Armstrong County”. Leader-Times, Kittanning. Thursday, 25 May 197_. (The last number is worn.)

Note: There is a Rupert Cemetry in South Bend Townhip. I think South Buffalo was a mistake.

SCHAEFFER, Anthony

Anthony SCHAEFFER, buried in the old Schaeffer Cemetery, Burrell Township.

Source: Newspaper article “Revolutionary Veterans Buried in Armstrong County”. Leader-Times, Kittanning. Thursday, 25 May 197_. (The last number is worn.)

SERFAS, John

John Serfas, buried in the old Schaeffer Cemetery, Burrell Township.

Source: Newspaper article “Revolutionary Veterans Buried in Armstrong County”. Leader-Times, Kittanning. Thursday, 25 May 197_. (The last number is worn.)

SHAFFER, Peter

Peter Shaffer, buried in a private cemetery in Gilpin Township.

Source: Newspaper article “Revolutionary Veterans Buried in Armstrong County”. Leader-Times, Kittanning. Thursday, 25 May 197_. (The last number is worn.)
……….
“Along Schenley Road in Gilpin Township you come to Schaeffer’s Cemetery in which there is a flagpole, erected through the efforts of Robert S. THOMPSON. On a weather-beaten headstone you read the name of Peter SCHAEFFER. He was a private in Captain Peter MUHLENBERG’s Company of Lehigh County Militia in the Revolutionary War.”

Source: A Century of Historical Progress of Leechburg, Pennsylvania from 1850 to 1950.

Many years ago, some of us located an old burial ground on this road. There were sunken graves and a rose bush growing, but we never found a tombstone. K. Marcinek

SLOAN, James

James Sloan d. 1821 in Armstrong Co. Source: Penna. Archives, 2nd Series, Vol. XIII, pg. 210.

STEELE, Isaac

Isaac STEELE, Sr., born about 1754, died 24 October 1842 at Sugarcreek Township. Buried in Sugarcreek Township.

Sources:
Obituary, The Armstrong Democrat & Farmers & Mechanics Advertiser, Thursday, 10 November 1842. Published at Kittanning, Pennsylvania. See Obituaries

1840 Federal Census, veteran’s list.

STITT, William

William Stitt, 1755 – 1834, Buried at Truby Farm in Gilpin Twp. Source: ACGC Quarterly

STUYVESANDTT, Tobias

Tobias Stuyvesandtt, 1759 – 1841. Buried at Christ -Rupp Church in Kittanning Twp. Source: Family Tradition, Peg Krekota.

TOWNSEND, Isaac

Isaac TOWNSEND born 27 Dec 1760, supposedly in Virginia. He came to area after given land for services rendered from serving during the American Revolution. Isaac married Rachel Regina KING, daughter of Mathias KING. In 1790 they lived in Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland County. The 1800, 1810, 1820 & 1830 Census, Isaac and his family were living in Allegheny Township, Armstrong County.

Isaac died 02 NOV 1837 and was buried in what is known as the Hine Cemetery, Bell Township, Westmoreland County. This cemetery rests on the hill overlooking the Borough of Avonmore. It appears this land was given for the use of a cemetery and Lutheran church. The church never came into existance, but many burials were made in the cemetery. Several prominent families of early Armstrong and Westmoreland Counites are buried here. Daniel ULAM, who also served during the Revolution is buried here.

The D. A. R. placed a plaque on the headstone of Isaac TOWNSEND.

Cutlope (Gottlieb) Hancock, Revolutionary soldier from New Jersey, had a ferry across the Kiskiminetas River in the general vicinity of Edmon, Armstrong County. I have a map showing it. He sold land to Isaac Townsend. I’m almost certain Cutlope is buried in the Maysville Cemetery, the one on the hill. A number of Mathias King’s daughters and their husbands served as baptismal sponsors for Cutlope’s children, including Isaac Townsend and his wife.

TRUBY, Michael

Michael Truby, 1762 – 1842. Buried in Old Kittanning Cemetery in Rayburn Twp., Armstrong County.

VASEY, John

John Vasey is residing in Armstrong County in 1821. Source: Penna. Archives, 2nd Series Vol. XIII, pg. 232.

VINICKEY, Joseph

Joseph VINICKEY, buried in the Mt. Zion Cemetery, South Buffalo Township.

Source: Newspaper article “Revolutionary Veterans Buried in Armstrong County”. Leader-Times, Kittanning. Thursday, 25 May 197_. (The last number is worn. I think South Buffalo is an error. Another source has Vinikey, Joseph buried at Mt. Zion Cemetery in South Bend Township.)

Vinikey, see Vinickey

WAGLE, see WEIGLEY, Isaac

WEIGLEY, Isaac

Revolutionary War Pension File #R11.285. WEIGLEY / WAGLE, Isaac.
18 November 1833, Isaac WEIGLEY appeared before the Court in Kittanning to apply for a pension. He was a resident of Plumcreek Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. He was born April 1758 at Easton, Northampton County, Pennsylvania. He moved with his father to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania in 1774, settling a few miles from the present town of Greenburg. He enlisted at Hannastown in 1775; he served four different tours. He married Mary C. on 9 May 1780, and they moved to Armstrong County in 1806. Isaac WEIGLEY died 8 October 1835 in Armstrong County. Mary C. WEIGLEY died 27 January 1824. A son, Isaac WEIGLEY, Jr., was 58 years old in November 1852 and a resident of Armstrong County.

WICK, Elisha

Elisha WICK, buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery, East Franklin Township.

Source: Newspaper article “Revolutionary Veterans Buried in Armstrong County”. Leader-Times, Kittanning. Thursday, 25 May 197_. (The last number is worn.)

WILSON, James

James Wilson is buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery in East Franklin Twp.

WOLF, Jacob

Jacob Wolf, 1752 – 1838 is buried in Sugarcreek Township. Source: “Early Deaths & Marriages”, pg. 56, compiled by Connie Mateer. Penna. Archives, 2nd Series. Vol. XIII, pg. 245
……….
Jacob WOLF. Revolutionary Pension File #S24023. 19 March 1833, Jacob Wolf of Sugarcreek Township, Armstrong County, appeared before the Court in Kittanning to apply for a pension. He stated: He entered service at Easton, Northampton County, Pennsylvania in March 1776, under Captain John SANTEE in the Flying Camp. He was born in Northampton County on 4 April 1753, as was recorded in his father’s bible which is in his possession. He lived in Northampton County until 1789 when he moved to Westmoreland County, and from there to present-day Armstrong County in 1794. Jonathan KING served with him.

YUNDT, Daniel

Daniel Yundt, 1748 – 1836 is burried at Christ – Rupp Cemetery in Kittanning Township. Yundt is one of the earlier spellings for the name we now know as Yount. Jundt is another variation.

ZEARPHUS, Henry

Henry Zearphus was residing in Armstrong Co. in 1814. In service during 1776 – 1777. He was wounded and taken at Croaked Billet in 1778. (This is more likely ‘Crooked Billet’.)

22 Responses to Revolutionary War Veterans

  1. 1776-1812-2012 More than 200 Years of Peace Celebrations across North America- July 1-4 – especially – along the St Lawrence River!

    Dr Louis Hebert/Forestell Tree/Trunk/Branches/Twigs PQ is completed except for the ancestors of John Onesime Lewis, b 1799, husband of Jessie Easton, b 1805; and, settled near Thomasburg-Stoco-Tweed, Hungerford Twp/Hastings County, Ontario.

    Note: Marguerite Matilda Lewis, born 1830, daughter of Jessie/John Lewis, was the wife of James Tobias Forestell, grandmother of Grand-father James Lewis Forestell.

    Do you know if Ezekiel – Silas O- Thomas Lewis, Eastern-Shefford-Sutton twp PQ; &/or William Lewis of Vermont are ancestors to John Onesime Lewis, near Thomasburg-Stoco, Ontario ?? Sincerely E Cumin
    ***********************************************************************

  2. Note: Did Morici Lewis, Uncle of Ezekiel, have any son &/or grandson named John Onezime Lewis, born 1799 in Eastern Twp, PQ, near Vermont Border ??

    Is there a complete list of the sons and grandsons of Captain James Lewis that would include Ezekiel and Silas.
    Final: Is there a list of the sons of Ezekiel and Silas – born 1795-1805 approx ??

    elisabeth.cumin@hotmail.com
    *******************************************************************

  3. Ken Kelly says:

    Hello,
    My ancestor, Edward Kelley, served with the Cumberland County Militia of PA during the Revolutionary War. He was living in Redbank Twp, Armstrong County PA at the time of his death in 1814. Has anyone previously looked into the location of his grave? Do you have volunteers that research the location of their farm, church, etc. as possible locations of his remains? Or what do you recommend, in order to try to locate him, please? Thank you very much for any possible assistance.
    Sincerely,
    Ken Kelly

  4. j.guthrie says:

    is there a book called captive tale written by joseph brownlee guthrie

    • D. Kathy Marcinek says:

      I have never heard of it but it is possible. I’ll do some snooping.

    • D. Kathy Marcinek says:

      There is a book titled “American Guthrie and Allied Families”, 1934, by Guthrie, Laurence R.

    • D. Crowley says:

      Yes, there was a book written about Elizabeth Guthrie by her last son, Joseph Brownlee Guthrie. It is not in print but wouldn’t it be wonderful if it were found in someone’s attic in Pennsylvania. Elizabeth Guthrie was my great , great, great, great, great grandmother.

      • Michelle McGaffic says:

        I am also related to Elizabeth Brownlee Guthrie through my grandfather who was a Keener. His mother was a Beatty. There is a book called Capitve’s Tale. I think I have it as I have most of his things now. I remember going with him to Hannas Town and he bought it there in the gift shop.

  5. Georgia Hileman Halloran says:

    I descend from PETER HEILMAN/HILEMAN. Peter was born in 1751 Sept. 28( according to German chrusrch record on LDS film # 193854) and he came to America in 1753. I also doubt that this Christain, bn 1710, is his father -I believe it was his brother .

    • Will Christman says:

      I just wanted to let Georgia Hileman Halloran know that I have an orphan’s court abstract from Westmoreland County, Docket A, 23 June 1806. Petition of Nicholas Snider, administrator of Christian Hyleman dec’d, stating that the deceased left a widow and six children (Polly, Betsy, Isaac, Peggy, Sally, and Christiana), all of whom are minors under the age of 14 years; and requesting the Court that Jacob Christman and Frederick (Sheveler ?) be appointed guardians over their persons and estates until they arrive at the age of 14 years. Approved. I also have a Peter Helman (Heilman?) in the Westmoreland County, Mount Pleasant Township, 1790 Federal Census a few entries underneath my family.

      I have been looking for the family of my 4x great grand father, Jacob Chrtistman (1760-1832) who married Elizabeth Lauffer and resided in Westmoreland County, Mount Pleasant Township, attended Greensburg Lutheran Church. I’ve been at a brick wall for quite a few years now. Because of these Heilman records, an entry for Elias and Ruth Christman of Bedford County at Greensburg Lutheran (I think Ruth Christman’s grandmother was Anna Catherine Heilman) I’m wondering if my Jacob could be connected to them even though I’ve already looked there and their Y-DNA is supossedly R1b and mine is R1A1. Any suggestion would be appreciated. jchristman8@att.net

      • Kathy Marcinek says:

        This is interesting. I live in the area of Kittanning Township where these Heilmans settled. I think the name you couldn’t quite make out was Frederick Schaeffer, probably spelled wrong. I’m not sure of that, though.

        Looks like a lot more research is needed here.

    • Faith Jack says:

      I am also a descendant of Christian/Peter/Solomon Heilman. Johann Christian Hileman/Heilman b 1709, baptised 1710 d 1790 was Peter Hileman’s father.

  6. About JOHN HARTMAN, son of Revolutionary War Soldier MICHAEL HARTMAN …

    His great granddaughter, my aunt Rebecca Nitsche whose mother Anna LaRue Moore was daughter of Rebecca Olinger, daughter of Anna Maria Hartman, a daughter of John Hartman, told me John had married a Leni Lenapi Indian girl named “Sarina.” Everything else Aunt Becka told me about family history seems to be true, but I don’t know how to validate this connection. Any ideas?

  7. Jan Catalogna says:

    Peter Yingst (Yeansgt) as spelled in his Rev. pension application on file at the Armstrong County Courthouse. His interrogation covers six pages detailing his movement across PA. Peter was from Germany, coming to America in 1766 aboard the ship Chance. His father Johann Heinrich Juengst (Yingst) settled in Lancaster/Lebanon County. Peter guarded Hessian prisoners of the Battle of Trenton and served serveral tours of duty as a substitute. He did not participate in any engagements. Peter settled in Armstrong County around 1830. Peter’s ancestors have been documented back to year 1400 through research done in Germany.

  8. Marie Reedy says:

    I cannot add any more about the service of James McMaster but I would like to comment on John Mullen named in McMaster’s application for a pension. I’m descended from Mullen’s son Joshua who settled in Henderson, Henderson County, Kentucky by about 1820. Joshua ran a tavern there for many years. I have a letter written by Joshua inquiring about the land that was possibly due his father for his service during the Revolutionary War. John Mullen is listed as a private in military rosters. John Mullen was a shoe maker in Abbotstown and was married to Allice Abbott, descendant of John Abbott the founder of Abbotstown. There are 2 other children named in John’s will, eldest daughter Deborah and a son Ebenezer less than 14. Possibly someone can tell me what became of the children and where John Mullen and Allice were buried. Allice Abbott Mullen remarried a man named Donaldson after John Mullen died . Mullen’s death was between 15 November 1780 and 26 March 1781. Donaldson died before 1790. The Mullens are Scots and belonged to the Church of Scotland according to Mullen’s will. Others named in the will are brothers – in -law of John Mullen: James Taggert, Junior and Edward Abbett.

  9. Kathy Marcinek says:

    So many of us with old Armstrong County roots have been told we have Native American blood. DNA shows it is usually not true. I suggest you have a DNA test to prove or disprove it. Good luck!

  10. Alexander Dunlap.
    and Elizebth Jack.

    looking for info on this family.

    Mark

  11. Paul Treacy says:

    James Calhoun, b. 1775, Crrigans, County Donegal, Ireland, d. ca. 1822, Pine Twp., now Boggs Twp., Armstrong County PA, was a Lieutenant under Captain John Caldwell and L. Col. James Taylor of the 6th Bat. Lancaster Co., PA, Militia, 1781, 1782. He was wounded during his time of service. His farm is still in family hands. OPver eith generations of this family have resided on these lands. Over 200 years of recorded history.

    • Charles Calhoun says:

      This James Calhoun was born 1745 or 1747, possibly in Carrigans, immigrated from Letterkenny, County Donegal, to Lancaster County (near present day Mercersburg, Franklin County PA). His military service was as a private in Cumberland County militia (with unit from same present day Franklin county location) under Robert McCoy, wounded and taken prisoner at the Battle of Crooked Billet (near Hatboro PA) in May 1788. This information is documented in research for the DAR by Fendrick and by published acts of PA legislature granting James Calhoun and Isaac Wiley old-age annuities for their service. Web search on James Calhoun will produce these documents.

      Mr Treacy’s remarks on James Calhoun of Armstrong County are frequently cited, but appear to combine information with other James Calhoun personages from Lancaster County and should be carefully reviewed for accuracy.

  12. Charles Calhoun says:

    Correction to my previous comment — James Calhoun wounded and taken prisoner at the Battle of Crooked Billet in May 1778, not 1788.

  13. Carroll says:

    SERFAS, John
    John Serfas, buried in the old Schaeffer Cemetery, Burrell Township.
    Source: Newspaper article “Revolutionary Veterans Buried in Armstrong County”. Leader-Times, Kittanning. Thursday, 25 May 197_. (The last number is worn.)
    ZEARPHUS, Henry
    Henry Zearphus was residing in Armstrong Co. in 1814. In service during 1776 – 1777. He was wounded and taken at Croaked Billet in 1778. (This is more likely ‘Crooked Billet’.)r
    Are these two men the same? Is one the father of Catherine Zerfass born 1775 married to John Philip Schaeffer (Rev War)? Where is Henry Zearphus (Rev War) buried in Armstrong County ? I am unable to locate.
    Thank you, Carroll

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